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There is some confusion on what Real Photo Postcards (RPPC) are, and how to differentiate from a printed postcard.

Real Photo Postcards are photographs that are reproduced by actually developing them onto photographic paper the size and weight of Postcards, with a Postcard back.

Or by examining the card to see if an old address back has been glued to a front that simulates a genuinely old card. One boy is holding the handles that would push a large wood toy trolley. As the engine has a pull string tied on the stack it appears to be a pull toy. On the right side of the photo at the bottom stands a doll. This is an original real photo postcard of a Indians & soldiers in a field from a wild west show. This real photo postcard is from a group of ten different real photo postcards that we found showing cowgirls, cowboys, & Indians, & some soldiers that all appear to be from a wild west show. The card is in fresh near mint unused condition just like it turned up in a Pennsylvania estate. This is an original real photo postcard of lodge members standing in a horsedrawn float. The photo is of an outdoor scene from Middletown, Pennsylvania which shows 16 people looking at wreckage from buildings. The card is in fresh near mint/mint unused condition just like it turned up in a Pennsylvania estate. This is an original real photo postcard of the Middletown Fire of Apr 9, 1910 which took place in Middletown, Pennsylvania. The back is soiled & shows a brown ring from when a glass sat on the front of the card. There is an unreadable penciled notation under the stamp box. This is an original real photo postcard of Indians around a campfire from a wild west show. The photo is probably of some small town in Louisiana.

Vintage and antique photographs of children with toys can be found also in our pages on Cabinet Cards, Carte de Visites, and Photos showing dolls and toys. Next to him sits a large composition doll propped up by a toy truck. Early twentieth century black and white postally unused postcard that shows a well dressed young boy and a wooden toy airplane on the table next to him. Over the doll on a table is a Lehmann tin toy automobile. The post card has a non-divided back & a "place one cent stamp here" stamp box. There is one small brown spot above the Lehmann toy. The photo is marked by the photographer in the negative at the lower right corner "No. The photo is of an outdoor scene from Easton, Pennsylvania which shows 10 lodge members standing in a float. The photo is of an outdoor scene from Middletown, Pennsylvania which shows the wreckage of the Y. This real photo postcard is from a group of ten different real photo postcards that we recently found showing cowgirls, cowboys, & Indians that all appear to be from a wild west show. In the photo accompanying this listing you can see a diagonal line. But, possibly New Orleans as the architecture looks appropriate for Louisiana. Original RPPC (real photo post card) showing three people sitting on horses.

And of course any image that contain a regularly patterned series of dots is not a photograph at all but a ink printed image.

Some halftone cards were printed on high gloss paper to resemble a photograph but their screen patterns will give them away if one is vigilant.

Click here for our Links page which has the Playle's link and many other helpful reference links on antique and vintage photography. The pedal car has an oval "American" name tag on the front. The card was never addressed & it was never mailed. At the left edge of the photo below the table top is a teddy bear wearing a dress which is facing away from the camera. post office The photo is marked by the photographer in the negative at the lower right corner "No. The photo is of an outdoor scene from Easton, Pennsylvania which shows 14 lodge members, an American flag, & a man looking out of the post office window. There is a 1/2" area on the left side of the photo where a finger touched the surface causing the fingerprint spot to have a mat finish rather than the glossy finish as present on the rest of the photo. Otherwise, the card is in excellent condition just like it turned up in a Pennsylvania estate. There is a brown circle on the front from where a glass once sat on the card.

The best way to tell the difference is to look at the Postcard with a magnifying glass.Most Real Photo Postcards, abbreviated RPPC, have information on their backs to help in identifying the manufacturer of the photographic paper that was used by the postcard publisher.If you can identify the paper manufacturer, you can approximate the age of the old postcard.But even here the effect is more of a softening of detail than a observable texture.Early real photo postcards are small by their very nature and since most were contact printed, not enlarged, there is no visible texture.

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